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Our Offices

  • Tavares Office

    Address

    203 N. St. Clair Abrams Avenue
    Tavares, Florida 32778-3259

  • Inverness Office

    Address

    303 Tompkins Street
    Suite 180
    Inverness, Florida 34450

    Phone

    352-344-1882

  • Clermont Office

    Address

    481 E. Highway 50
    #201
    Clermont, Florida 34711

    Phone

    352-242-1933

Ratings & Reviews

  • 5.0/5.0

    — Lori Robbins

  • 5.0/5.0

    I am a trial attorney who had been practicing law for ten years. Attorneys only hire the best when the things that matter the most in their own lives are threatened with harm. That is why I hired Christopher R. Largey of Largey Law when my ...
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    — Paul Darby

  • 5.0/5.0

    Following my car accident I was referred by a friend to Largey Law Firm. Chris Largey agreed to take my case. He and Rosie along with his staff were very reassuring that they would take care if all my legal issues dealing with the insuran...
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    — Steve Jones

  • 5.0/5.0

    As a family law attorney, I had the opportunity to work with Chris in a case involving an injunction that was part of a family law matter that I was involved in. I wholeheartedly recommend him as a criminal law attorney. In my opinion, he ...
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    — Dusty Twyman-Morey

  • 5.0/5.0

    Informative friendly and helpful professional. Passionate and caring for the right of the person represented.

    — Marc Lovric

Florida Court Hears Arguments in Defense of Juvenile Offenders

On March 6, the Florida Supreme Court heard arguments regarding the nature of a 2012 U.S. Supreme Court decision, which ruled that mandatory life sentences for juvenile offenders are unconstitutional because they represent cruel and unusual punishment.

Specifically, the court considered the question of whether Rebecca Lee Falcon, a Panama City woman convicted of murdering a cab driver when she was 15, should be required to stay in prison for the rest of her life. Falcon represents a much larger group of more than 200 Florida prisoners who are currently serving life sentences — without the possibility for parole — for crimes committed when they were under the age of 18.

Prior to the landmark 2012 Supreme Court ruling, which examined the high-profile Miller v. Alabama case, any juveniles convicted of murder in Florida were given mandatory life sentences without parole. However, this ruling occurred after the sentences for Falcon and a number of other juvenile prisoners had been finalized. Now, the question is whether the ruling is retroactive. If so, Falcon and other prisoners can undergo re-sentencing hearings, which take into account important issues like the nature of the crime, the defendant’s maturity and the potential for rehabilitation.

Falcon’s defense lawyer has argued that her client should be given post-conviction relief to avoid obvious injustice. The Florida Supreme Court’s ruling is pending.

The 2012 U.S. Supreme Court ruling represents a significant victory for individuals currently serving life sentences for crimes committed when they were very young. However, juvenile offenders may still face short- and long-term penalties for crimes committed in their youth. If your child has been convicted of a crime, you need to work with a knowledgeable and compassionate criminal defense attorney.